Brian Eno

24 03 2010

Brian Eno is an English musician, composer, record producer, music theorist and singer, who, as a solo artist, is best known as one of the principal innovators of ambient music.

BBC Arena 2010

For this documentary, Another Green World, Brian Eno has given Arena unprecedented access to observe him working in his studio and talking with friends and colleagues.

Eno engages with fellow influential minds, including Richard Dawkins, Malcolm Gladwell, David Whittaker and Steve Lillywhite, in a series of conversations on science, art, systems analysis, producing and cybernetics.

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Artscape: Brian Eno in Conversation

Honouring his 30-odd years of creative achievements, Artscape’s Brian Eno In Conversation features a Q&A interview between Eno and ABC arts presenter Andrew Frost. Discussing Eno’s artistic inspirations, ideas and views on contemporary art, the program profiles an artist who continues to be at the forefront of not just music – but also art and technology.

watch on vimeo site

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Paul Morley interviews Brian Eno in this 1992 programme ‘The Thing is…’

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Imaginary Landscapes, a 40-minute documentary from 1989, directed by Duncan Ward and Gabriella Cardazzo. Rather ironically the sound on this video is too loud and quite distorted. Fair warning.

A better one-part version can be seen here

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AUDIO

Listen here

Name: Ode To Gravity: Brian Eno (Special Edition, I of IV)
Item Type: Sound Recording
Duration: 116 min
Event Type: Interview and Music
Program Origin: KPFA

original description:

“In an interview recorded before a live audience on Saturday February 2, 1980, as part of the Speaking of Music series, Charles Amirkhanian and Brian Eno discuss phonetic poetry, how Brian writes his lyrics, and the spirit of inquisitiveness at KPFA Radio. The two also listen to some of Brian Eno’s pieces, including “After the Heat”, “Everything Merges With the Night”, “Another Green World”, “Spirits Drifting” and sections of other works. Brian Eno also discusses artist Peter Schmidt and their work on the Oblique Strategies Cards, being a record producer, process vs. product, and looping. Part I ends with some thoughts on Steve Reich and his music.

Part II starts with a discussion of “the history of the recording studio as a compositional tool;” and Eno’s collaboration with David Byrne on the then yet-to-be-released album, “My Life in the Bush of Ghosts”. Eno also talks about, and listens to, songs by Elvis Presley, The Supremes, Sly Stone, Lee “Scratch” Perry, and Jimi Hendrix. Eno then offers some unfinished pieces from the album with David Byrne.

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Baloney Detection Kit – Michael Shermer

3 02 2010

With a sea of information coming at us from all directions, how do we sift out the misinformation and bogus claims, and get to the truth? Michael Shermer, Publisher of Skeptic magazine, lays out a “Baloney Detection Kit” — ten questions we should ask when encountering a claim.

The Ten Questions

  1. How reliable is the source of the claim?
  2. Does the source make similar claims?
  3. Have the claims been verified by somebody else?
  4. Does this fit with the way the world works?
  5. Has anyone tried to disprove the claim?
  6. Where does the preponderance of evidence point?
  7. Is the claimant playing by the rules of science?
  8. Is the claimant providing positive evidence?
  9. Does the new theory account for as many phenomena as the old theory?
  10. Are personal beliefs driving the claim?




The Root of All Evil?

22 01 2010

The Root of All Evil? Part 1: The God Delusion. (Richard Dawkins, 2006)

47:51

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The Root of All Evil? is a television documentary, written and presented by Richard Dawkins, in which he argues that the world would be better off without religion. The documentary was first broadcast in January 2006, in the form of two 45-minute episodes (excluding advertisement breaks), on Channel 4 in the UK. Dawkins has said that the title “The Root of All Evil?” was not his preferred choice, but that Channel 4 had insisted on it to create controversy.[1] His sole concession from the producers on the title was the addition of the question mark. Dawkins has stated that the notion of anything being the root of all evil is ridiculous.[2] Dawkins’s book The God Delusion, released in September 2006, goes on to examine the topics raised in the documentary in greater detail. The God Delusion explores the unproven beliefs that are treated as factual by many religions and the extremes to which some followers have taken them. Dawkins opens the programme by describing the “would-be murderers . . . who want to kill you and me, and themselves, because they’re motivated by what they think is the highest ideal.” Dawkins argues that “the process of non-thinking called faith” is not a way of understanding the world, but instead stands in fundamental opposition to modern science and the scientific method, and is divisive and dangerous. The Root of All Evil? is a television documentary, written and presented by Richard Dawkins, in which he argues that the world would be better off without religion. The documentary was first broadcast in January 2006, in the form of two 45-minute episodes (excluding advertisement breaks), on Channel 4 in the UK. Dawkins has said that the title “The Root of All Evil?” was not his preferred choice, but that Channel 4 had insisted on it to create controversy.[1] His sole concession from the producers on the title was the addition of the question mark.

Richard Dawkins – Root Of All Evil – Part 2 – The Virus Of Faith (2006)
47:59

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Richard Dawkins – The Enemies Of Reason – Part1 – Slaves to Superstition

21 01 2010

47:54

Dawkins points to some of science’s achievements and describes it as freeing “most of us” from superstition and dogma. Picking up from his superstition-reason distinction in The Root of All Evil? (while recycling some footage from it), he then says reason is facing an “epidemic of superstition” that “impoverishes our culture” and introduces gurus that persuade us “to run away from reality”. He calls the present day “dangerous times”. He returns to science’s achievements, including the fact that, by extending our lifespan, it helps us to better appreciate its ‘other’ achievements.

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